1 Thessalonians 4 Commentary of the Bible

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Handling your Sex Drive  ( 1 Thess 4:1-8 )  Sunday Message

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I must say that 1987 was one of the most depressing years that I have lived through. Looking back, it seems the headlines continually spoke of disasters, murders and scandals. As I reflected upon the year, I wondered if there was not some way to eliminate, or at least cut back, all this evil. I thought of one thing which would certainly reduce crime, bring an end to the divorce scandal, eliminate teenage pregnancies, reduce the prison population, stop the sale of pornography, and decrease poverty.

Finding the Will of God  ( 1 Thessalonians 4:3 )  Sunday Message

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Is there any problem more persistently difficult to a Christian, especially a young Christian, than the problem of finding the will of God? At young people's conferences, when surveys are made of subjects that young people would like to have discussed, this subject is always high on the list. Either this is no problem at all or it is a very serious and perplexing mystery.

Comfort at the Grave  ( 1 Thess 4:9-18 )  Sunday Message

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No one knows what circumstances he is going to face tomorrow. That is characteristic of the future. But there is something that comes before tomorrow. It is called today, and that is where we must live. We cannot live in tomorrow, but we can live today. This issue was troubling the Thessalonian Christians. They were looking toward tomorrow, but wondering what to do today. The Apostle Paul's advice to them in his first Thessalonian letter is, as usual, very practical. We have it in Chapter 4, beginning with Verse 9: