Mark: He Came to Serve

The Gospel of Mark is the briefest of all the Gospels, and therefore easy to read in one sitting. Its brevity is probably the reason it is the most often translated book of the New Testament. The Wycliffe translators generally begin their translation work with the Gospel of Mark because it is so short and gives the whole story quickly.

Bible Studies in the Gospel of Mark

Please click the heading above to see the messages in this series.

The Servant who Rules

The Place to Begin
Mk 1:1-8
Jesus Came
Mk 1:9-15
A Day in the Life of Jesus
Mk 1:16-39
The Healer of Hurts
Mk 1:40 - 2:12
The Scandal Maker
Mk 2:13 - 3:6
False Forces
Mk 3:7-35
The Dimming of the Light
Mk 4:1-34
Seed Thoughts
Mk 4:3-32
Why are you Afraid?
Mk 4:35 - 5:20
The Weakness of the World
Mk 5:21 - 6:6
Who is This?
Mk 6:7-52
When Rite is Wrong
Mk 6:53 - 7:30
Do you Not Yet Understand?
Mk 7:31 - 8:21
The Turning Point
Mk 8:22-33

The Ruler who Serves

The Way of the Cross
Mk 8:34-38
The Glory that Follows
Mk 8:38 - 9:29
The Child in Our Midst
Mk 9:30-50
What about Divorce?
Mk 10:1-12
The Plight of the Overprivileged
Mk 10:13-31
The Ambitious Heart
Mk 10:32-52
The Rumor of Hope
Mk 16:1-8
The King is Coming
Mk 11:1-25
By What Authority?
Mk 11:27 - 12:27
Top Priority
Mk 12:28-44
Watch!
Mk 13
Love's Extravagance
Mk 14:1-25
Smite the Shepherd
Mk 14:26-52
Jesus and the Priests
Mk 14:53-72
Jesus and the Rulers
Mk 15:1-20
The Awful Penalty
Mk 15:21-47
Those Signs Following
Mk 16:9-20

Overview the Gospel of Mark

from Adventuring Through the Bible

The Gospel of Mark, the second book in the New Testament, is 16 short chapters long, the briefest of all the Gospels, and therefore easy to read in one sitting. Its brevity is probably the reason it is the most often translated book of the New Testament. The Wycliffe translators, I understand, almost invariably begin their translation work with the Gospel of Mark because it is so short and gives the whole story in one brief compass.

This Gospel has a completely different atmosphere from the Gospel of Matthew. If you go on to read Luke and John, you will see that they are still different from Matthew and Mark, Matthew, Mark and Luke are more similar to each other than any of these three are to the Gospel of John. Nevertheless, they are all different.

There is a reason for this, designed deliberately by the Holy Spirit. We make a mistake if we think these four Gospels are four biographies of the Lord. They are not biographies at all, they are character sketches, intended to be different, intended to present different points of view. Therefore, they constitute four distinct views of our Lord and of his work.

The Gospel of Matthew is written to present Christ as the King. The Gospel of Mark presents his character as a servant. The Gospel of Luke presents him as the Son of man -- as man in his essential humanity. The Gospel of John presents him as the Son of God, that is, his deity, and there you find the greatest claims for his deity.